6 must-try Taiwanese dishes

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    Majestic mountains, gushing waterfalls, shimmering beaches, traditional Chinese temples and hot spring resorts; all make Taiwan a popular getaway.

    Of course, no holiday is complete without savouring the destination’s cuisine, right? Influenced by Chinese and Japanese cuisines, here are a few Taiwanese dishes you should dig into on your next visit to the island nation. Remember, holiday calories don’t count.

    Bamboo shoots with mayonnaise

    This dish is mostly prepared by the Taiwanese during winter or spring. Fresh, juicy bamboo shoots are first cooked until tender, then they are cooled. Later, they are served with a generous helping of thick mayonnaise.

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    Coffin bread

    A popular street snack, Coffin Bread is either square or rectangular in shape. The middle portion of the deep-fried thick toast is removed. Then, the cavity is filled with creamy soup, vegetables, corn and chicken meat. With a rich buttery bread crust and tasty ingredients in it, the Coffin Bread will leave you wanting more.

    Chicken wings stuffed with rice

    Love chicken? Well, these chicken wings are stuffed with fried rice. Marinated in sesame oil and sauces, these chicken wings will delight you with its juicy flavour and delicious fried rice.

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    Oyster omelette

    Potato starch is used in the egg batter to prepare the omelette. Then, the omelette is stuffed with small oysters. Later, a savoury sauce is added to the omelette which makes it irresistible and tempting.

    Milkfish soup

    Milkfish Soup aka Shimu Yu is prepared from an entire milkfish. Sweet in flavour, locals add ginger to the soup, which supposedly is a cure to common cold. Other than in the form of soup, Milkfish is also served fried and steamed. There is also a Milkfish Palace in Taiwan, dedicated to this aquatic species.

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    Pidan doufu

    This dish comprises of slices of tofu and thousand-year-old eggs. These eggs are aged for weeks to months. Served cold, the Pidan Doufu is topped with spring onion, garlic, vinegar and soy sauce.

    Bon appetit!